Going Green With Your Bookshelf

April is Earth month and being conscious of the environment has become a bigger priority in people’s lives.  I can remember when it seemed a complete fad that no one would take seriously.  Thankfully, our world and issues such as global warming have become mainstream.

Libraries often face the dilemma of unwanted books, those that have become damaged beyond repair, those that are out of date and no longer factual or relevant, and sadly, those books that no one really wants to read and are taking up space for books that are more desirable to check out.

It is a subject that readers also find in their own personal bookshelves.  Books that you picked up on the bargain shelf at Barnes and Noble because they were only $2 and then hated the story, books someone may have given you, but that you have no interest in reading, or maybe you found yourself simply with books you’ve read, enjoyed but don’t want to keep anymore.  Myself, I had a stack of cookbooks that I just never used and tons of non-fiction and novels from that bargain bin, and I now understand why were in the bargain bin.   In college, I  was sometimes stuck with textbooks for gen-ed classes and had no idea what to do with them once class was over, and I couldn’t sell them back because a new edition came out every year.

Try one of these ideas if you are drowning in books! Photo from pteittinen on Flickr.

What do we do with all these lonely, sad, unloved and unwanted books?  There are many options that are friendly to the environment, the reader, and the book too!  Instead of just dumping the book in the garbage can so it can fill up a landfill and never find its true reader love, consider one of these options:

Donate.  Places such as Goodwill, AmVets, and Vietnam Veterans will take used books and magazines, and you can get a receipt for a tax write-off.  Plus, you’re supporting a worthwhile cause.  I would encourage you not to donate to your library unless you know they will end up in the book sale room, should a library have one.  Libraries are often trying to find places themselves  to rid their weeded materials.

Sell them!  Places such as used book stores take books off your hands and sometimes will pay you for them!    I always take my cash and instead of running, end up buying books.  (More books!)  One of my favorite bookshops called Half-Price Books is an independent seller, has stores around the country and buys used books, cds, games, etc.  I’ve also found several smaller local used bookstores and thrift stores that may not necessarily buy them for more than 25 cents, but the shop owner will put them on the shelves for someone else to discover.  Having a garage sale this spring or summer?  A box of books is often the first place I go and I’ve scored some steals for a dollar or less, sometimes even free because the seller just wants them gone!  Ebay and other sites like CraigsList are decent resources for selling, but I’ve only had luck with series of magazines.  Ebay and other sales sites seems to work better when you have a hot collectible that you know is worth money or a very expensive textbook that is in good condition.

Recycle.  Unfortunately, the big question of what to do with your old set of Encyclopedias may be as simple as recycling them.  I know, it pains me to write that because I love them!  Yet, unless you can find a museum or historical society of some kind that will want them for archival or preservation purposes, the material in them is not always useful to an everyday user.  When all else fails, and you don’t know what to do, don’t dump your books in the garbage to end up in a landfill.  Recycle.

Pass Them Along!  Hospitals, nursing homes, gyms, hair salons and other places with waiting rooms or reading time often love free magazine and books! Just make sure you ask before you dump a pile of Martha Stewarts on the end table.  Not everyone appreciates the act of sharing.  Sites such as Paperbook Swap, BookMooch, and BookCrossing are also fun ways to trade books with other readers and join a community of readers.  They are often free or have a small nominal fee to cover postage and shipping charges.  When buying books, check out sites such as Better World Books who then donates a book to someone else across the world!

Be Creative.  Books as arts and crafts are ever so trendy and fashionable!  There are tons of ideas online and on Pinterest for turning old or unwanted books into works of art!  I thought this blog post was pretty interesting and had some great ideas.

Have you found yourself stuck with a pile of books and don’t know what to do?  Have you tried any of these and found successes or failures?  Do you have any resources you’ve used other than those shown here?  I would love to hear them in the comments.

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Internship Fun (out of) the Sun!

I am so excited to write to you today about my experience this summer in my internship at the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin, IL.  Not only has the exceptional Youth Services staff embraced me as one of their own, but the work I am doing is truly helping the young customers at this fantastic library.

I’ve been interning here since January, 2011 on special projects yet, this summer with more available time on my hands, began regular weekly hours.  With the advent of the summer reading program, it was the perfect time!  Gail Borden has outdone itself with adapting the theme of “A Midsummer Knight’s Read,” the iREAD theme for this year.  The library, and especially the Youth Services department has been transformed into a medieval dream complete with a castle in the center of the lobby area!  Registrations began on May 24, 2011 and I was there in the booth to help kids of all ages from Pre-Readers to Middle Schoolers sign up.  On the first day, it was nonstop, and it was a joy to see the smiles on the children’s faces as we gave them their reading log plus encouraged them to check out some books to begin their summer journey.  Since the first day, the registrations have been steady and I’ve been in the booth helping ever since! It is a truly heartwarming and worthwhile experience to see kids excited to read and know I’ve had a part in bringing that to their world.

Another project I’ve delved right into is regular weeding and development of the collection.  I began with the Fairy Tale NonFiction collection.  The most challenging aspect of this particular collection is one can see merit in almost all fairy tales as many offer a unique version of the story.  Some considerations I took when evaluating were:

Is this author, title, story unique to the collection?  In some instances there were books that were clearly not appealing in cover art appearing dated and old, yet because it was unique, I debated whether or not it was worthwhile keeping the book.  Most often I looked within BWI to find a newer or alternative version that would be more appropriate, but there were instances when it was not possible.  In those cases, I then checked the circulation numbers and had to make a decision of whether or not to weed the book.

Is the book able to be repaired?  These books that could be repaired and were worthwhile to the collection were then sent to tech services to be fixed.  In some cases, the age of the book was new but was such a well-loved story that I ordered a new book to replace the worn one. However, the challenge became when the book was too damaged to be repaired, and it was no longer in print to order.  I then had to go back to my previous decision making of uniqueness and alternative authors and stories.

This was a great project and I’ve since been able to work on other similar collection evaluation and development processes.

Next week, I will be showcasing my program to children in grades 3rd through 5th at the weekly Medieval Mania event.  My theme is fractured fairy tales and I have stories, a gingerbread house craft and games planned for this hour long segment.  It has been so fun to plan the crafts and games, organize the flow of the event, and choose stories to read aloud.  I can’t wait to share the success of the program!

More to come this summer so stay tuned for additional posts!

Communicating and Managing Change

Communicating and managing change is perhaps one of the most important aspects a manager must employ in order for the operations of their department, their library, to function at its best.  By nature, people are not receptive to change, they don’t know to handle the differences that are now occurring at their library.  When the changes are communicated in a positive manner and managed with a mentality that change is an opportunity, library employees will better understand what is happening and not be fearful.

One example of assisting librarians to embrace and manage change is through a collection development resource guide.  Through such a guide, new librarians can quickly get acclimated with their new surroundings and current librarians can get updated with policy and department changes and updates at their convenience.  This central location for a resource guide also provides one place for all librarians to communicate when a wiki or discussion board is added to the guide.

Review the guide I created for the University of Illinois Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Another example of change in a library is the process of weeding.  Addressed in this presentation is why weeding is necessary, the fears and misconceptions, positive ways to communicate and manage the process, and several case studies of how poor management and communication negatively affected the library’s perception to the community.