Sharing the Love of Reading

What does it mean to read from the heart? We are bombarded with the written word every day. We are thrown little tickers at the bottom of newscasts, huge advertisements on billboards as we commute to work, and then in our email which we get on every device possible. Sometimes all that reading overkill can dampen our spirits for reading for enjoyment, pleasure, escape, knowledge.

There are so many types of readers:

  • Casual readers who may not always have the time, and so they pick up the one great book of the year and love every bit of it.
  • There are those readers who don’t really enjoy books but prefer magazines, internet blogs or newspapers. This doesn’t mean they are not readers because they are not reading a traditionally bound book.
  • Some people simply enjoy the artistry and visual format of graphic novels or comics and stick by them through thick and thin! Are these novels? Are these comics? Such a debate in the literary world.
  • Another debate? Ereaders. Are these readers still reading books even if it’s on an Ereader? Of course! It’s just a different format.
  • Then there are those people like me who love to read, every day, will swallow up the written word and will read everything.

No matter what kind of reader you are, or what type of material you identify with the best, make sure you read. Even if you think you don’t have time to read a book, the amount of reading you do throughout your day is worthwhile.  You’ll find that even taking in little bits and pieces of reading every day will help you find a new outlet in the world to strike up a conversation or simply feel like you are involved in the world. I keep a small notebook where I write a note of something I want to visit later when I have time.  This simple technique can help you be a passionate reader again.

Try to remember how you felt when you were learning how to read as a child, was it a good experience? Hopefully, you were able to appreciate how it felt to read your first chapter book and the thrill to read the next one. If it wasn’t a good experience, wipe that slate clean!! Start over!  Even if you struggled with reading in school and gave up on the magic of books, you can get it back.  Try starting with a shorter book, a young adult novel, or a graphic novel and you just might surprise yourself.

Is there a child in your life whom you could share the love of reading and books?   I guarantee you it will be a joy you’ll want to experience over and over.   It might even make you appreciate picture books as an adult!

Since it’s February, and our theme is LOVE, I though I would share my love of reading with you, most particularly, my love of reading complete escapism books.  They are quick, easy, and allow me to forget the nonsense of the day.  My guilty pleasure is Nicholas Sparks books.  They are formulaic, often tragic or dramatic, but they always leave me feeling that I can believe in love and good in the world.  My other favorite author is Sophie Kinsella who wrote the Shopaholic series.  Her humor is witty and fun and her books always put a smile on my face.

Don’t let the stress of your day dampen your spirits for reading.  It’s the perfect destresser for even a 5 minute alone time moment!

Do you have any romance novels you want to share?  Any books you find to be complete enjoyment?  Any tips on how to rediscover your love of reading?  I’d love to hear them them in the comments or email me!

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Information Needs & Opportunities

As Librarians, we are in constant search of information and we are typically the first to embrace new technologies, ideas and concepts to better our library, serve our patrons and help positively influence the community.  This desire also means we are in constant search of recognizing and understanding the needs of those patrons and communities, and identifying the opportunities to better assist in serving.  These two blog postings best exemplify two opportunities libraries currently face; addressing the needs of the Millennial Generation and making smaller, the Digital Divide plus understanding the need that arises as a result; The Hyperlinked LIbrary.   Links to referenced articles are included.

Blog Posting: Original Date October 24, 2010

In thinking about how libraries can better “reach all users and understanding users,” I am reminded of a conversation I had with my two Millenial generation cousins about Facebook.  They each have hundreds and hundreds of friends, and I asked them if they even knew who all those people were.    They each replied with the same response…”well, yes, I either go to school with them, or play sports with them or met them at a party…it’s just what we do, it’s what everybody does…” and I realized how natural it was for them to just friend people.  I used to be a person who friended everyone I knew or met because it was simply fun, and then upon realizing I was sharing information with people I really didn’t know or cared about, cleaned up my list dramatically.  The difference between our two generations was apparent with this simple idea of Facebook friends.

I had this difference in mind when I read the article titled, “How Millenials Sharing Habits Can Benefit Organizations” in the Harvard Business Review.  I could understand how these differences in generations was also permeating my life at home and at work.  The sharing aspect does appear in more ways than just sharing with Facebook friends and Twitter.  The life of the business world is no longer about personal growth and promotion, although those are still a strong goals, but more about the Team and what is good for the Team and how can I make the Team better.  This sharing aspect of collaborative projects and reviewing drafts while I believe is great for certain types of work, also takes out the individuality of the work.  No longer am I the author of a newsletter article, it’s the marketing department that wrote it because of the team meeting they had to brainstorm about the topic.  I am one of the narcissistic Gen X’rs that likes my name on the byline.

In libraries, however, I think this sharing aspect beautifully combines the best of what is needed in order for libraries to succeed.  Libraries are there to serve yes, the individual patron, but also the community of patrons.  The Team is essential in order for the library as a place to thrive because of the purpose it serves; learning, literacy, advocacy are goals that can start with the individual, but will essentially need a team or a group in order to truly be at its best.

Read “How Millenials Sharing Habits Can Benefit Organizations”

Blog Posting: Original Date November 6, 2010

The Hyperlinked Library

Upon reading the article, “The Visitors”, the image that kept sticking with me was the reference desk in the library.  The reference desk has always been the place where I remember the image of the “shhhhhshng” librarian to be, her bun and glasses firmly in place.  In my local public library, they have moved the reference desk to the center of the library, it’s round and has loads of information already available and the librarians are very visible.  I don’t feel so afraid to approach them, and in fact, they appear more professional and helpful than ever.  I find this point from the article extremely beneficial for libraries because it makes me think of all the ways the library is and could be hyperlinked to its patrons: “The potential for the commons/community space in libraries to be many things–fun, playful, engaging, useful. A totally red romance room, games available to all, a chance to view local history and add to it are all part of the space.”

In this article, the “Unquiet Library” discusses the positive effects of being “unquiet” in a library and how it fosters activity.  Activity in a library can mean so many things to different people, and in the library, activity can mean a group of men reading the newspapers, teenagers playing a game in the young adult area or families choosing DVDs to take home.  I find activity in the Rebecca Crown library at Dominican University to be engaging everytime I go inside and I am always looking around to see what people are doing.  The interaction between students and even those patrons looking for books or working on homework is interesting for me to see how the libraries resources are being used.

I am reminded of a blog I subscribe to called, “Designing Better Libraries” which talks about not only the physical design, but also the design of its materials and use. There is a great article about the topic of “Experience Design” that I think you’ll enjoy. Hyperlinked libraries can certainly increase the effectiveness and enjoyment of the library because by the very concept create a unique and fun experience design, full of activity that everyone can utilize and love.

Read “The Visitors” and “Unquiet Library Has High-Schoolers Geeked.”