Bibliodiversity: Diversity in Books? Books that are Diverse?

I recently discovered a really great podcast called Books on the Nightstand which is a weekly 30 minute discussion on books, hot topics and reader comments.  I love the diversity of the books they discuss and there is always a new idea that has me thinking.  I’ve been catching up on old episodes, and a topic came up called “Bibliodiversity.”  Now this wasn’t an original idea of BOTN, originally a concept from an academic journal.  Yet, I just loved the word and all the possibility behind the meaning.  It really had me thinking and asking questions!

Just what is Bibliodiversity?  Could it be a fancy way to say, “multicultural” literature?  Perhaps. Could it mean the diversity in reading materials such as print and ebooks?  Sure.  Yet, that word diversity, in relation to the huge bibliophile universe could mean any multitude of ideas.  Of course, the English major in me wanted to break down the actual word, taking in the prefix “biblio” and suffix “diversity” and Google them to see what overwhelming internet results would show.  Too much.  Dictionary.com defines the word “biblio” as that ‘used in the formation of compound words with the meaning “book”.’   They define the word “diversity” as ‘ 1. the state or fact of being diverse;  difference; unlikeness.  2. variety; multiformity. 3. a point of difference.’  Now, the possibilities are really endless with this absolutely magical word! I still have no idea how to narrow this concept down!

I suppose I like to think of the word Bibliodiversity as my own concoction of reading tastes in being an eclectic and different mix of genres in books.  Someone else could say it was their own formation of a diverse group of books in unique formats.  Or perhaps taking into account the simplicity of there being just a matter of point of difference, it could mean someone’s collection of French cookbooks but from different regions.

Of course, then I could take those meanings and make it about authors or book covers or even bookmarks! I could literally write a whole book, pun intended.

I love this word. I may need to visit it again.

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Communicating and Managing Change

Communicating and managing change is perhaps one of the most important aspects a manager must employ in order for the operations of their department, their library, to function at its best.  By nature, people are not receptive to change, they don’t know to handle the differences that are now occurring at their library.  When the changes are communicated in a positive manner and managed with a mentality that change is an opportunity, library employees will better understand what is happening and not be fearful.

One example of assisting librarians to embrace and manage change is through a collection development resource guide.  Through such a guide, new librarians can quickly get acclimated with their new surroundings and current librarians can get updated with policy and department changes and updates at their convenience.  This central location for a resource guide also provides one place for all librarians to communicate when a wiki or discussion board is added to the guide.

Review the guide I created for the University of Illinois Rare Books and Manuscripts Library

Another example of change in a library is the process of weeding.  Addressed in this presentation is why weeding is necessary, the fears and misconceptions, positive ways to communicate and manage the process, and several case studies of how poor management and communication negatively affected the library’s perception to the community.